Park development

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Burgess Park Planning and Redevelopment Facts:  Redevelopment around the park

These are important issues for coming local elections. Raise them with ward councillor candidates. 

There are at least six planning application in the pipeline for sites around Burgess Park. All are for tall buildings which will make a significant impact on the park.

Each application is made separately there is no consideration for cumulative impact. Tall buildings have already been approved for the Aylesbury redevelopment along Albany Road.

• Impact of tall buildings
Burgess Park is a very long, narrow park. Tall buildings all around will have a significant impact on the green space; how it looks and feels, if the immediate horizon is dominated by buildings.

The new Southwark Plan does not define a tall building or the amount of green space which would need to be provided for the new residents.

• Pressure on green space
Planning applications for development around Burgess Park (including current applications) all make the assumption that green space and play space can be provided by the park.

No assessment is made of cumulative impact of redevelopment – with resultant local population growth – on existing green space.

Burgess Park is a relatively new man-made park; it has increased in popularity and is well used all year round. It requires high levels of maintenance and repair to keep pace with wear and tear of heavy usage. Areas of the park will be out of use at some time; current drainage improvement works will restrict access to central portions of the park for the two years.

Friends of Burges Park proposals:

• Planning and Regeneration
Cumulative impact of new developments on Burgess Park must be a standard part of the planning application process. A comprehensive development plan which monitors and sets a framework for development around the park is needed. The Southwark Plan should:

  • specify maximum building height for developments bordering the park taking into account the extent of shade from new buildings given the park’s narrow shape;
  • monitor the park’s capacity to absorb increases in user demand;

• Metropolitan Open Land
The council should compulsorily purchase buildings within Burgess Park Metropolitan Open Land footprint. This would prevent excessive building being proposed (and then having to be opposed by local residents).

• Sunshine ordinance
The council should set up local planning requirements for high standard for green spaces including access to sunshine. The impact of multiple tall buildings on green space must be considered. Sunshine ordinance is already used in places like New York, San Francisco and Japan.

FOBP April 2018